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Butler County
513-867-5727
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937-399-2917
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937-562-7400
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937-332-6919
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937-456-4818
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Darke Humane Society
937-548-1009

It’s a Dangerous World out There

Cats who stay safely at home are protected from many hazards:

Traffic: Collisions with cars and other vehicles are common cat killers. It is a myth that cats are ‘street wise” about cars. Cats are intelligent and alert but, like most other animals, stand little chance against fast-moving vehicles.

Diseases: Rabies and other diseases that can be transmitted to humans are a serious public health concern. And free-roaming cats are far more likely to come in contact with other animals that commonly carry rabies, like raccoons. In fact, cats are more than twice as likely to become infected with rabies as dogs. There are other serious diseases that affect only cats. According to the American Association of Feline Practitioners, as many as 15% of sick cats are infected with feline leukemia or feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)—and many cats have both. These viruses are fatal and transmitted through contact with other cats. Disease is one reason that two out of three veterinarians recommend keeping cats indoors.

Poisons: Poisons exist on chemically treated lawns, in bait left out to kill rats or mice, and in auto antifreeze—which has an appealing taste—that leaks from cars.

Fleas: Free-roaming cats inevitably pick up fleas and ticks and then bring these pests into the home. Fleas can cause anemia, skin irritations and allergies in cats—and transmit diseases to humans through their bites.

Other Animals: Other cats, dogs, and wild predators such as coyotes, raccoons, and foxes are potential enemies of cats and often engage in fights that leave cats injured or dead. Outdoor cats can suffer torn ears, cut eyes, abscesses, and other injuries requiring expensive veterinary treatment.

Cruel People: Shelter workers see cats that have been burned, poisoned, or otherwise tortured by children and disturbed adults.

Loss of Home: Fewer than 5% of “found” cats taken in by animal shelters are reunited with their families. That’s why outfitting your cat with a collar and visible identification is one of the best steps you can take to keep your cat safe. In addition, having your cat microchipped provides a valuable backup ID system.

Copyright 02002 The Humane Society of the United States. All rights reserved.

Animal Shelter News

A SPECIAL AND SURPRISE DONATION TO THE DARKE COUNTY ANIMAL SHELTER BY ASHTON TURPIN ON HER BIRTHDAY
Ashton Turpin and her Mom, Sarah Rose, made a surprise stop at the Darke County Animal Shelter. Ashton turned 8 years...  Full Story

5K RUN/WALK FOR SCENTRAL PARK
The Darke County Friends of the Shelter are sponsoring their annual 5KRun/Walk for Scentral Park dog park on Saturday,...  Full Story

Tessa Riegle and her Father Isaac, make a donation to the Darke County Animal Shelter.
Tessa Riegle had a service project to do through the St. Mary’s Church in Greenville and thought of the Darke County...  Full Story


Note: We are not the Humane Society. The Humane Society is a voluntary group and can be reached by mail at 7053 St. Rt. 49N or by phone at 937.548.1009